G.Mend-Ooyo
Дэлхий ээж тандаа би хайртай
World Poetry Days in Mongolia
Opinions

Essays

When I tell you all about the abovementioned, not only I mean to tell you about the fact that our harmonious existence and mutual respect with the natural world, our apprehension of it and discussion with it, have been preserved and remained in the nomadic civilization on the wild Mongol steppe to this day, but I also would like to raise questions on how can we protect and preserve the valuable aspects of this civilization and make them our guidelines for the future.
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May we write with good and prayerful words, and with spiritual language, may we place ourselves within society, within the palaces of culture, and within gardens, and thus speak together of positive things. From our grandfathers, we begin by listening to prayers and benedictions, and we generally employ words which have the traditional human qualities and so, when we come to adulthood, may we create positive power in this way. Our grandfathers used to say prayers such as "Be at peace, and happy eternally," and "Be happy and live a long life," and our grandmother's prayers were the finest words absorbed into the milky tea they made, and this was the positive power which the children offered to nature and the world and the universe, beginning at the level of the state symbol.
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Whilst working on the large Migjed Chenrezi project, I announced in 1991 the Script Culture program, a large and beautiful presentation in Mongolia’s proncipal exhibition hall.  Working together with the famous scholar Dr D Tserensodnom, we began to prepare for publication a wonderful book by Shagj, previously unpublished, entitled Annotated Dictionary of Mongolian.  It was this dictionary which had been the reason for Shagj’s arrest and execution.  In passing sentence, the Interior Ministry at the time declared that, “In writing his Annotated Dictionary of Mongolian, Shagj has annotated many of the ancient, feudal words and has sought to minimise the new and progressive terms,” and then they had him shot.  Shagj’s dictionary was published in 1993, and in Beijing, since at that time Mongolia did not possess suitable type for the traditional script.  Tserensodnom and I completed Shagj’s work with the addition of some three hundred entries.  Later, we also published his Dictionary of Mongolian Usage, originally produced in 1929, and for the 110th anniversary of his birth in 1996 we published these two dictionaries together with Mongolian Script the Easy Way
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History resurrects when it is imminently brought back to mind. The moment you go back to that far away pasttime in history or call it to the modernity, the time becomes relatively meaningless; everything comes to belong to the inner universe and prophecy.
Uyghur. Although this word sounds familiar and close to our hearts, we do not speculate and investigate further. But this time the incentive to remember the times of Uyghurs came to me, meeting so may Uyghur writers at the “International Conference of Ural Altaic speakers”, organized by the PEN Uyghur Center.
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Essays